Zorro

A hugely psychologically addictive drug, Zoroaster (usually just called Zorro on the streets of Al Amarja) is named for the ancient Persian prophet whose ideas of a dualistic cosmos contantly torn in struggle between Good and Evil have affected almost all subsequent religions – and the name is well-deserved.

Taking Zorro fills the user with an absolute sense of right and wrong – their side is Absolutely Good, all others are Absolutely Evil. This state of psuedo-Randian objectivity lasts never quite long enough, and the user will almost always crave that feeling again.

The drug does not turn its users into raging psychotics, but rather, into fanatically fundamentalist holders of whatever positions they already held. Violence does frequently result, but it is the result of the extreme intransigence of the users, an indirect effect of the drug, not a direct one. Perhaps unsurprisingly it was created and is now sold by a nihilist conspiracy intent on worsening conflicts in order to hasten the wider embrace of nihilism.

Related Drugs: Blue Shock, Communion, MDA-Cubed, Nightmare, Relapse, Slo-Mo and Wings.