St Kilda

It may come as a surprise to learn that there never was a Saint named Kilda. Not in any religion. The name of this region is based on a corruption of the original Old Norse, suitably churchified to appeal to an era (the Victorian) when viking paganism did not appeal.

Skildar, as it was originally named, was the rocky outcrop today covered by Acland Street’s houses and apartment buildings. It was used as a neutral ground where the two factions of Vikings who had split up after arriving in Port Phillip Bay could meet: the settlers of Bangholme and Seaholme met here each midwinter and midsummer for rites conducted in the names of Odin and Thor, Balder and Freyja, to conduct vital political negotiations, to allow their youngsters to meet and pick spouses, and, of course, to get thoroughly pissed, and sail back holme the next day with a hangover that would them wish Ragnorak would start that day.

The viking colonies were both extinct long before other Europeans came to the future site of Melbourne, but the names they gave to their places remained on the lips on the Boonwurrung, the tribe they have interacted with the most, and were eventually passed along to the English and Irish settlers of early Melbourne, who (unfortunately) assumed that the name St Kilda was simply evidence that the natives were not as lost to Christianity as they claimed to be.

Suburbs near St Kilda:

Port Phillip Bay Middle Park Albert Park MELBOURNE Prahran Prahran Prahran Armadale
Port Phillip Bay St Kilda West St Kilda MELBOURNE Windsor Windsor Prahran Armadale
Port Phillip Bay St Kilda St Kilda St Kilda St Kilda St Kilda East St Kilda East Caulfield North
Port Phillip Bay St Kilda St Kilda St Kilda St Kilda Balaclava St Kilda East Caulfield North
Port Phillip Bay Elwood Elwood Elwood Elwood Ripponlea St Kilda East Caulfield
Port Phillip Bay Port Phillip Bay Elwood Elwood Elwood Brighton Elsternwick Caulfield Souh