1957 – Police first find evidence of Ed Gein’s killings

Ed Gein only ever confessed to two murders, although the circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that there were more.

It all fell apart for him on November 16, 1957 when the disappearance of Bernice Worden from Plainfield, Wisconsin (their mutual hometown) was reported to the police. They then investigated Gein’s house – he being the last person to see her – and found Worden’s body there.

They also found body parts of at least ten other women, possibly more. Gein was eventually convicted of Worden’s murder only – it being judged prohibitively expensive to investigate all of them – and Gein claimed to have exhumed them, not murdered them. Gein was convicted of two murders – the ones he confessed to, and later died in prison.

Referenced in:

Nipple Belt — Tad
Ed Gein — Macabre
Ed Gein — Killdozer
Young God — Swans
Skinned — Blind Melon
Dead Skin Mask — Slayer
Plainfield — Church of Misery
Nothing to Gein — Mudvayne
Edward Gein — The Fibonaccis
The Geins — Macabre Minstrels
Old Mean Ed Gein — The Fibonaccis
Ballad of Ed Gein — Swamp Zombies
Sex Is Bad Eddie — The Tenth Stage

1991 – Jeffrey Dahmer is arrested for murder

Jeffrey Dahmer was finally caught when his latest intended victim – a man named Tracy Edwards, managed to escape from Dahmer’s apartment. Edwards managed to flag down two cops, whom he led back to Apartment 213. Dahmer had hidden some of the evidence, but by no means all, and after backup was summoned and arrived, he was arrested.

A search of the apartment turned up Dahmer’s collection of photographs taken of his victims, four severed human heads, numerous other severed body parts and seven human skulls.

Dahmer was sentenced to 15 consecutive life terms, totalling 957 years. He was eventually beaten to death by another inmate in 1994.

Referenced in:
213 – Slayer
The Brain – Macabre
Dirty Frank – Pearl Jam
Cold – Unusual Suspect
Room 213 – Dead Moon
Apartment 213 – Macabre
Arc Arsenal – At the Drive-In
Apartment 213 – HotrodboB
Freeze Dried Man – Macabre
What’s That Smell? – Macabre
Still Born/Still Life – Christian Death
Sinthasomphone – Venetian Snares
Tom Dahmer Mixtape Freestyle – Necro
Room 213 (Jeffrey Dahmer) – Church of Misery
The Ballad Of Jeffrey Dahmer – Pinkard & Bowden
Jeffrey Dahmer’s CookBook – Bloody Tea vs. Human Raise

1989 – China declares martial law in response to the Tiananmen Square protests

Inspired by, among other things, the fall of Communist regimes in Eastern Europe, approximately 100,000 Chinese protestors, many of them students, occupied Tiananmen Square in Beijing for several weeks beginning on April 14, 1989.

In what can only be described as a massive over-reaction, the government of the People’s Republic of China declared martial law and sent in tanks and infantry to disperse the protestors. The army was delayed by other protestors, but on June 3, they reached the Square.

What followed has often, and not inaccurately, been labelled a massacre. Due to the government’s highly efficient censorship, an accurate death toll has never been released, and even today the incident officially did not occur. Unofficially, a number that has been variously estimated as between 140 and 7000 people died in the protests, and hundreds more were injured, all in an attempt to win rights that the majority of people reading this blog take for granted.

Referenced in:

China – Joan Baez
Blood Red – Slayer
Tin Omen – Skinny Puppy
Watching TV – Roger Waters
Hypnotize – System of a Down
Seven Days in May – Testament
The Tiananmen Man – Nevermore
We Didn’t Start the Fire – Billy Joel
The King of Sunset Town – Marillion
Tiananmen Square – Chumbawumba
Black Boys on Mopeds – Sinéad O’Connor
The Ghost in You – Siouxsie and the Banshees