Seabrook

Despite possessing a decent brook (indeed, more than one if it rains), and being not at all far from the sea (although never actually possessing a coastline), Seabrook was not named for reasons of geography. It was named, instead, after the chess champion Maximillian Sieb, a friend of the Tone-Herr brothers who lived nearby. In the 1880s, he was the undisputed chess champion on several continents, including Lemuria, Mu and North America, in addition to his native Europe and adopted Australia. (He did plan to be the chess champion of Antarctica, but was stymied by the death of Robert Falcon Scott just as their slow-burning chess-by-mail game was getting interesting.)

The locals, who were not at all happy about their village being lumped in with the separate, and looked-down-upon village of Point Cook, even if both were located on the banks of the same watercourse, Skeleton Creek, chose to name their village after their local hero, and to cement the occasion, challenged the residents of Point Cook to provide a chess champion to compete against Seib. The worthies of Point Cook selected one of their own, Killian Jones, to play Seib. Jones was not a skilled chess player, but his playing style – which consisted of long, long pauses between moves while he tried to calculate every possible outcome of every possible move, followed by longer still pauses when he lost his place and had to start over again – drove Seib almost to distraction.

The skilled and subtle chess champion thus decided for once to abandon any strategy more complex than taking as many of his opponent’s pieces as quickly as possible. Not only was this satisfying on a visceral level, but it also had the effect of reducing Jones’ options for replying moves, shortening his annoying pauses. However, it was an incautious strategy, that left Seib open to the use of the same strategy against him, since it necessarily involved piece trades and a certain neglect of defensive play. By the game’s end, Jones was reduced to only a knight and his king, while Seib’s only remaining pieces were his rooks and king – fortunately, enough for him to force a check before Jones found a way to stalemate him. The village – and later, the suburb (although not without some semantic drift) – was duly named for the champion, and the piece he used in his winning move, lest the people of Point Cook ever forget the day that Seib’s Rook won its freedom.Despite possessing a decent brook (indeed, more than one if it rains), and being not at all far from the sea (although never actually possessing a coastline), Seabrook was not named for reasons of geography. It was named, instead, after the chess champion Maximillian Sieb, a friend of the Tone-Herr brothers who lived nearby. In the 1880s, he was the undisputed chess champion on several continents, including Lemuria, Mu and North America, in addition to his native Europe and adopted Australia. (He did plan to be the chess champion of Antarctica, but was stymied by the death of Robert Falcon Scott just as their slow-burning chess-by-mail game was getting interesting.)

The locals, who were not at all happy about their village being lumped in with the separate, and looked-down-upon village of Point Cook, even if both were located on the banks of the same watercourse, Skeleton Creek, chose to name their village after their local hero, and to cement the occasion, challenged the residents of Point Cook to provide a chess champion to compete against Seib. The worthies of Point Cook selected one of their own, Killian Jones, to play Seib. Jones was not a skilled chess player, but his playing style – which consisted of long, long pauses between moves while he tried to calculate every possible outcome of every possible move, followed by longer still pauses when he lost his place and had to start over again – drove Seib almost to distraction.

The skilled and subtle chess champion thus decided for once to abandon any strategy more complex than taking as many of his opponent’s pieces as quickly as possible. Not only was this satisfying on a visceral level, but it also had the effect of reducing Jones’ options for replying moves, shortening his annoying pauses. However, it was an incautious strategy, that left Seib open to the use of the same strategy against him, since it necessarily involved piece trades and a certain neglect of defensive play. By the game’s end, Jones was reduced to only a knight and his king, while Seib’s only remaining pieces were his rooks and king – fortunately, enough for him to force a check before Jones found a way to stalemate him. The village – and later, the suburb (although not without some semantic drift) – was duly named for the champion, and the piece he used in his winning move, lest the people of Point Cook ever forget the day that Seib’s Rook won its freedom.

Suburbs near Seabrook: