1973 — Pablo Picasso dies

One of the most influential artists of the 20th century, Picasso was the co-founder the Cubist movement, the inventor of constructed sculpture, the co-inventor of collage, and a relentlessly innovative artist for most of his life. He is best known for his cubist works, such as the legendary 1937 painting “Guernica” and the 1967 sculpture known as the Chicago Picasso (for which he refused the $100,000 he had been promised, instead donating it to the people of Chicago).

In the last few years of his life, Picasso created a myriad of new paintings and sketches, and it was only after his death that the art critics of the world realised that Picasso had moved into neo-Expressionism before anyone else had even conceived of it: an innovator to his dying day.

Referenced in:
Picasso’s Last Words (Drink To Me) — Paul McCartney and Wings

1973 – Picasso draws his last known work, “Couple”

In his last years, Picasso’s productivity dropped off from the manic peaks of his youth. To be fair, he was in his nineties by then, and in all his decades, had created more than 50,000 works of art ranging from sculptures to sketches, in addition the paintings he was most famous for. He had certainly earned a quiet retirement, and he seemed for the most part content with his lot, if disappointed by his exile from his native Spain.

His last sketch, entitled “Couple” shows that although he may have slowed down with age, he has lost none of his skill or talent. His last painting had been created some years earlier, but showed a similar spirit. Picasso would die only a little later in that same year, during a dinner party with some friends. His last words were “Drink to me, drink to my health, you know I can’t drink any more.”

Referenced in:
The Last Picasso — Neil Diamond

1900 – Picasso has his first public exhibition

Pablo Picasso’s first public exhibition of his works was held in Barcelona, four months short of his nineteenth birthday. Much of his early work is now considered derivative, showing clear signs of the influence of those earlier painters that Picasso admired, such as El Greco, Diego Velaskes and Fransisco Goya.

The exhibition consisted of 150 portraits of Picasso’s friends, and was well-received. Picasso would shortly afterwards relocate to Paris, and embark on what would become known as his ‘Blue Period.’

Subsequently, Pablo Picasso was frequently called an asshole.

Referenced in:

Pablo Picasso – Burning Sensations