1935 – “Triumph of the Will” premieres

“Triumph of the Will” (or in German, “Triumph des Willens”) is the best known film of Leni Riefenstahl. It is a blatant propaganda piece that covers the 1934 Nazi Party rally at Nuremberg, featuring footage of the massive crowds who attended the rally and speeches given by Hitler himself.

Its dubious political associations aside, “Triumph of the Will” is today recognized as a classic of twentieth century cinema, one of the most frequently homaged and parodied works in the cinematic canon, featuring innovations in camera and music use for feature films. Leni Riefenstahl is today acclaimed as a genius of cinematic art, with horribly bad taste in friends.

Referenced in:

Triumph of the Swill — Dead Kennedys

1921 – Adolf Hitler becomes Führer of the Nazi Party

Hitler was the 55th person to join the German Worker’s Party – the same party that later re-named itself the National Socialist Party. In less than two years, he rose to a position of such popularity and influence that he was more or less able to blackmail his way into being appointed its leader.

On July 11, 1921, he resigned from the party. Fearing that this would cause a split in the party from which it could not recover, the leadership panicked. Hitler then announced he would only return to the party if made leader (or “Fuhrer”). After some umming and erring, the party gave in to his demand, and on July 29, he was introduced as the party’s Fuhrer for the first time. He would remain Fuhrer for the next 24 years, including his years spent in prison during the Twenties (although a deputy took over some responsibilities in this time).

Referenced in:

To Be Or Not To Be (The Hitler Rap) – Mel Brooks

1933 – The Nazi Party wins the German Federal Election

Adolf Hitler was already Chancellor of Germany at the time this election was held, and he took full advantage of his powers (and willingness to ignore the legal restrictions on them) in order to ensure that the Nazi Party won. Various Nazi Party organisations “monitored” the election, and it is widely believed that the election was at least partially stolen.

In the event, the Nazi Party did not win an absolute majority, but was forced to maintain its coalition with the German National People’s Party in order to form a government. On March 24th, Hitler would use their numbers to pass the Enabling Act, giving him dictatorial powers in Germany – and in several other nations, after September 1939.

Referenced in:

To Be Or Not To Be (The Hitler Rap) – Mel Brooks