1935 — The Nuremberg Laws are passed by the Reichstag

Unanimously passed by the Reichstag on the evening of September 15, 1935, the Nuremberg Laws were the first legal codification of Nazi anti-Semitism. There were two laws: the Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honour, which prohibited marriages and extramarital intercourse between “Jews” and “Germans” and also the employment of “German” females under forty-five in Jewish households; and The Reich Citizenship Law, declared those not of German blood to be Staatsangehörige (state subjects) while those classified as “Aryans” were Reichsbürger (citizens of the Reich). In effect, this second law stripped Jews of German citizenship.

In addition, the laws contained a codification of who was considered to be Jewish, defined by how many grandparents one had who were Jewish or German. There were four statuses under the law, of which two were considered Jewish and two German. A later expansion of the law extended its provisions to Gypsies and Negroes. These laws remained in effect until the German surrender, nearly ten years later.

Referenced in:
Mrs. O — The Dreden Dolls

1933 — Adolf Hitler becomes Chancellor of Germany

It’s often overlooked, what the enormity of his crimes afterwards, but Hitler came to power more or less legally, elected Chancellor of Germany in an election not that much more corrupt than any seen in modern democracies. But his accession to the highest position in Germany was not enough for him.

There were enemies to be purged and pogrommed, lebensraum to be reclaimed, treaties to be ignored or violated, and, of course, the most devastating war in human history to start, and fortunately for us all, to lose. But while his run lasted, he had a better claim to the title of emperor of Europe than any man since the fall of Rome, won in just as bloody a fashion as any Roman Caesar.

Referenced in:
To Be Or Not To Be (The Hitler Rap) — Mel Brooks

1938 – Henry Ford is awarded the Grand Cross of the German Eagle

Henry Ford was celebrating his 75th birthday when he was presented with the Grand Cross by the German Ambassador. The highest decoration that Germany awarded to non-citizens, it was given to him in honour of his service to German industry (i.e. helping equip the Wehrmacht), and also, one can’t help thinking, his service to the cause of anti-Semitism.

Ford’s German company, Ford-Werke, would later get him in trouble when it violated the Geneva Convention by employing prisoners of war in 1940. Ford himself was a staunch opponent of American entry into World War Two right up until the day before Pearl Harbour – he changed his tune very quickly thereafter.

Referenced in:

Henry Ford was a Facist — David Rovics