Mount Waverley

Once upon a time, when the sea reached inland many miles north of the fords, covering the Patterson River’s valley and much more besides, there was an exception. A single, solitary, rocky island that poked above the sea of waves. The very peak of a seamount, the remains of an extinct volcano. As the centuries passed, and the waters slowly receeded, the rocks eroded away, leaving a flatter, more rounded hill. The sea was long forgotten in these parts by the time the white man came, leaving only a few confusing legends among the natives.

But confused or not, the famed translator Georges Hillariou sought to make sense of the legends of the Boon-Wurrung, and managed to extract from their words a single enigmatic name for this place: the mountain of the sea of waves. Deciding that this name was far too long for common usage, Hillariou rendered it more poetically into English as the Wavy Mountain. But it was the writings of Al Stimson, which insisted on rendering that name as Mount Waverly, that finally found a name that would stand the test of time. Ironically, Stimson’s writings were deeply scornful of the idea that the sea had ever reached this far inland (although Stimson also once tried to walk what he called Bass Trail from Pearl Bay to Launceston, so it’s unclear how much he believed his own writings).

Suburbs near Mount Waverly:

Burwood Burwood East Burwood East Burwood
Burwood Mount Waverley Mount Waverley Glen Waverley
Ashwood Mount Waverley Mount Waverley Glen Waverley
Chadstone Mount Waverley Mount Waverley Glen Waverley
Oakliegh East Oakliegh East Notting Hill Notting Hill