McCrae

The history of the Clan McCrae goes back many centuries to when the first scion of that line, Angus “That Crazy Bastard” McGuiness, first distinguished himself in battle. A Scotsman, he served with distinction in the war between the Scots and their most ancient arch-enemy, other Scots, in the years after the Romans abandoned Hadrian’s Wall for the bad joke it was. It was a time when centralised authority was non-existent in Scotland, when clans formed in the villages that supported the distilleries.

Angus was awarded his own tartan, and the title Angus the Crae, by his king, Hamish McBannockburn, who was the undisputed monarch of an area about the size of Ftiztroy Gardens. Angus’ eldest son, Tony, became the first McCrae (Mc meaning ‘son of’) and the proud line began there.

Centuries later, the McCraes had made themselves sufficiently unpopular with their leaders that they were invited to colonise new lands (or, as one legend has it, lured onto a boat full of whiskey and set adrift). Through many dangers and privations, they made their way to Port Phillip Bay, where they discovered that they had once again been beaten by the people they referred to as ‘the bastard English’. Claiming a windswept hill as their own, the Clan McCrae settled down to a life of alcoholism and subsistence farming, occasionally enlivened by righteous donnybrooks with the Irish farmers who lived next door. The area still bears their name today, but alas, their attempts to start a distillery there failed utterly.

Suburbs near McCrae:

Port Phillip Bay Port Phillip Bay Port Phillip Bay
Rosebud McCrae Dromana
Rosebud Rosebud Arthur’s Seat