1924 — Leopold and Loeb kill Bobby Franks

Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb were students at the University of Chicago who were enamoured of the works of Friedrich Nietzsche, in particular his concept of the Superman. They interpreted the Superman as being above the law, and accordingly committed an escalating series of crimes, starting with petty vandalism and finally ending in murder. The murder was carefully planned to be ‘the perfect crime,’ but it fell far short of that intention.

They decided to kidnap and kill a randomly chosen young boy. Although they planned to ransom the boy, they always intended to kill him rather than returning him. Bobby Franks was only 14 years old when the duo abducted and killed him. Their ransom note was delivered to the Franks house the next day, when Bobby was already dead. The pair were arrested on May 29, and Loeb confessed first, blaming the whole thing on Leopold; informed of Loeb’s confession, Leopold likewise confessed and blamed his partner.

Referenced in:
Superior — Thrill Me original Cast

1973 — The Great King Rat dies

Only three facts are known about the circumstances of the Great King Rat’s death: the proximate cause was syphillis, it was forty-four years to the day since his birth, and the date was May 21st. Even the year is an estimate.

It is known that the Great King Rat was, at the time of his death, a notorious dirty old man, and my feeling is that he was probably involved with organized crime syndicates in London. Given the cause of his death, it seems likely that he did not use condoms.

Referenced in:

Great King Rat — Queen

1929 — The Great King Rat is born

Little is known of the circumstances of the Great King Rat’s birth, other than its date of May 21st. Even the year is an estimate.

It is known that the Great King Rat would grow up to become a notorious dirty old man, and my feeling is that he was probably involved with organized crime syndicates in London. Given the cause of his death, it seems likely that he did not use condoms.

Referenced in:

Great King Rat — Queen

1927 – Charles Lindbergh completes the first solo non-stop trans-Atlantic flight

In the 1920’s, aviators were heroes. They were bold explorers and experimenters, pushing back the boundaries of the known. And none of them loomed larger in the public eye than Charles “Lucky” Lindbergh.

At the age of 25, this formerly obscure US Air Mail pilot was catapulted to fame and fortune when he completed the remarkable feat of being the first man to fly solo across the Atlantic. Flying a custom-built single engine monoplane named The Spirit of St Louis, he took off from from Roosevelt Field on Long Island shortly before 8AM on May 20, and landed 35 hours later at Le Bourget Field in Paris.

This exploit won him the Orteig Prize, a sum of $25,000. He was also feted and decorated, receiving the Medal of Honor from the USA and the Legion of Honour from France, among other awards.

Referenced in:
Lucky Lindy – Tony Randall
All That Jazz – ‘Chicago’ cast
Lindbergh (The Eagle Of The U.S.A.) – written by Howard Johnson and Al Sherman