Jurassic Park and the World of Darkness

As with the three films, this setting neatly divides into three parts: prior to the first film, during the period of the trilogy and following the third film.

In the earliest stage, before the events of the first film, Jurassic Park is a sort of battleground between two arms of the Technocracy: the Progenitors, whose baby it is, and the Syndicate, who are holding the checkbook. These tensions are evident in the film – Hammond’s difficulties with his investors are merely the tip of the iceberg.

A game set in this period is probably best run as a game set within the intrigues and rivalries of the Technocracy itself, with the various species of shape-changers providing an external enemy if one is required.

After the first film, when Ian Malcolm writes his book about the Park, the second stage begins. Word about the Park’s existence and nature slowly leaks out – for all that Malcolm is ridiculed for his book, there are those who believe him. It’s only after the San Diego incident that Malcolm is vindicated, and coverage of the Park saturates the media. After this time, it’s public knowledge.

In one sense, this is a victory for the Technocracy: although the Park itself is a failure, the masses are now compelled to accept that technology has advanced, that the world has changed – the Technocracy has strengthened its grip on the paradigm of the masses. Games set during this may wish to concentrate on battles of media manipulation between the Technocracy and the Traditions – it’s not so much the existence of the dinosaurs as the meaning of them that is important now. (The odd alliance of the Verbena and the Sons of Ether that might spring up to defend the dinosaurs is another twist that Storytellers can use to shake things up.)

After the third movie, which concludes with pterodactyls flying off the island, looking for new territories, a third stage begins. In this stage, it is the battle of humans vs dinosaurs that takes centre stage. (This could be set earlier – the original novel includes a group of velociraptors who make their way to the mainland, and the second novel does the same with procompothnagus.) This stage is probably best not played as Mage, but as Werewolf – the new dinosaurs, especially the velociraptors, find allies amongst the Mokole, the Nagah and possibly the Rokea, and institute a new Impergium – with all the rest of the Bete caught in the middle. The grim irony that it is humanity itself who creates the Apocalypse will not be lost on the Garou.

SOURCES:
Jurassic Park The World of Darkness


Blade Runner and Jurassic Park

There is, of course, a perfectly logical point of commonality between these two dystopias: the prominence of genetic engineering in both settings. But the exact details of the connection are a little harder to tease out.

So much depends on what became of International Genetic Technologies, Inc (better known as InGen). While the third film makes it fairly clear that the company itself is most likely gone, it’s unlikely that the valuable intellectual properties it developed have been forgotten. We know from the first film that InGen had an industrial espionage problem even when things were going well – how much worse will that have gotten when there isn’t enough money to maintain security?

So one way or another, it seems likely that the genetic advances spearheaded by John Hammond have made their way into the hands of Eldon Tyrell. And Tyrell, of course, took them to the next level, improving on and even perfecting some of the things Hammond had tried and failed to create. (Most notably, of course, an off-switch.)

But there’s no way this experimentation was perfect or painless. Somewhere out there in space – perhaps near the shoulder of Orion, or by the Tannhauser Gate – there is a world (or possibly more than one) populated by the discards of Tyrell’s research. The unusably mutated, the horrifically miscagenated, the irretrievably insane failures of a genetic crash research program. All trying to survive in a world they never made (and to which they are very poorly suited), to build lives and even civilisations armed with little more than race memory. (Being a properly parsimonious businessmen, it is likely that Tyrell uses this place to help train replicants intended for military use – might as well get some return for that investment, right?)

SOURCES:
Blade Runner Jurassic Park


Jurassic Park III (2001)

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Score Tracklist :

  1. Isla Sorna Sailing Situation
  2. Dinosaur Fly-By
  3. Cooper’s Last Stand
  4. Raptor Room
  5. Raptor Repartee
  6. Tree People
  7. Pteranodon Habitat
  8. Tiny Pecking Pteranodons
  9. Billy Oblivion
  10. Brachinosaurs on the Bank
  11. Nash Calling
  12. Bone Man Ben
  13. Frenzy Fuselage
  14. Clash of Extinction
  15. Hat Returns/End Credits
  16. Big Hat, No Cattle — Randy Newman

Tracks not on Soundtrack:

The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)

VHS | DVD | Blu-ray | Download

Score Tracklist :

  1. Lost World
  2. Island Prologue
  3. Malcolm’s Journey
  4. Hunt
  5. Trek
  6. Finding Camp Jurassic
  7. Rescuing Sarah
  8. Hammond’s Plan
  9. Raptors Appear
  10. Compys Dine
  11. Stegosaurus
  12. Ludlow’s Demise
  13. Visitor in San Diego
  14. Finale and Jurassic Park Theme

Tracks not on Soundtrack:

Jurassic Park (1993)

VHS | DVD | Blu-ray | Download

Score Tracklist :

  1. Opening Titles
  2. Theme from Jurassic Park
  3. Incident at Isla Nublar
  4. Journey to the Island
  5. Raptor Attack Listen
  6. Hatching Baby Raptor
  7. Welcome to Jurassic Park
  8. My Friend, the Brachiosaurus
  9. Dennis Steals the Embryo
  10. Tree for My Bed
  11. High-Wire Stunts
  12. Remembering Petticoat Lane
  13. Jurassic Park Gate
  14. Eye to Eye
  15. T-Rex Rescue & Finale
  16. End Credits

Tracks not on Soundtrack: