1965 – The Young Rascals release “I Ain’t Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore”

The Young Rascals – later simply the Rascals – were a quartet from New Jersey: Eddie Brigati (vocals), Felix Cavaliere (keyboard, vocals), Gene Cornish (guitar) and Dino Danelli (drums). In a career lasting a mere eight years, they had three number one singles in the USA, including “People Got To Be Free” and “Groovin'”.

“I Ain’t Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore” was their first single, which reached only to #52 on the American charts. It was included on their debut album, released in late March of 1966, and has been covered a number of times. The best known of these covers is likely the Divinyls’ version from 1992, which appeared on the soundtrack of the original “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” film. Other artists to cover the song include the Jackson Five and Shania Twain.

Referenced in:

R.O.C.K. in the U.S.A. — John Cougar Mellencamp

1956 – Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers release “Why Do Fools Fall In Love”

Frankie Lymon was only 13 when “Why Do Fools Fall In Love?” was released. The song reached number 6 on the US charts and number 1 on the UK charts. The song would eventually be ranked #307 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

All of which was good news for Lymon, who co-wrote the song and thus did well from the royalties. Less good was Lymon’s fate – he died of a heroin overdose twelve years later…

Referenced in:

R.O.C.K. in the U.S.A. (A Salute to 60’s Rock) — John Cougar Mellencamp

1962 – Bobby Fuller releases “You’re in Love”

Bobby Fuller was one of a generation of Texas-born rockers inspired by Buddy Holly. Fuller was a singer, songwriter and guitar player, who formed his own band, the Bobby Fuller Four. His first single was the double a-side of “You’re In love” and “Guess We’ll Fall In Love” in 1962.

The song that he is best known for, “I Fought The Law”, was a cover of a Sonny Curtis song – Fuller recorded two different versions of it, one in 1964 and one in 1965. The latter version was his single biggest hit, which reached the Top Ten on the charts shortly before his death in somewhat mysterious circumstances on July 16, 1966.

Referenced in:

R.O.C.K. in the U.S.A. — John Cougar Mellencamp