1492 – The Alhambra Decree’s deadline expires

Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon were the joint monarchs of their two kingdoms, and both staunch Catholics, when they issued the Alhambra Decree on March 31, 1492. It required all Jews to remove themselves – or be expelled by force – from the territories claimed by Aragon and Castille. It did leave a loophole, though – a sincere conversion to Catholicism and abandonment of the Jewish faith would permit these Jews to stay.

Few took advantage of the loophole, and of those who did, many practiced only the forms of the Catholic faith, continuing their Judaic practices in private. Of those who left, about half fled to Portugal, and most of the others wound up living in the cities of Salonika, Sarajevo, Izmir, Thessaloniniki or Constantinople, where the exiled Jews, who were predominately Sephardic, mingled with the Mizrahi Jews who already lived there. The Decree was eventually revoked… in 1968. (Yes, you read that right.)

Referenced in:
Harlem Renaissance — Immortal Technique