Belgrave

In 1874, the geologist Paulos Tyabb was furious. He had begun a survey of the Dandenong Mountain range in the previous year, and was approximately halfway through it in August of 1874. He was, in his own considered estimation, going mad. And he knew why, too: because of those damned birds. While most visitors to Australia find them charming, the distinctive chiming cry of the bellbird was completely foreign to Tyabb’s experience, while also reminding him of a more high-pitched version of the church bells he had been so happy to leave behind in Europe.

Perhaps it truly was madness, or maybe it was merely wishful thinking, but Tyabb would conclude his survey of the Dandenongs by publishing the conclusion that the area just downstream from the confluence of Clematis Creek, Sherbrooke Creek and Pound Creek would be swallowed by a giant earth tremor, which would erase the forested valley inhabited by the bellbirds, and the bellbirds themselves. It was this prediction that led him to name the area Belgrave, although he always spelled it with a double L – the single only came into use due a typo when the signs at the new train station were first painted, in 1904 (after it was renamed from Monbulk in order to avoid giving free advertising to the jam company).

As with most of Paulos Tyabb’s predictions, this one never came true, but the area still bears the name he optimistically gave it.

Suburbs near Belgrave:

Upwey Tecoma Sherbrooke Sherbrooke The Patch The Patch
Upwey Tecoma Belgrave Sherbrooke Kallista Kallista
Upwey Tecoma Belgrave Selby Selby Menzies Creek
Lysterfield Belgrave Heights Belgrave Heights Selby Selby Menzies Creek
Lysterfield Belgrave South Belgrave South Belgrave South Selby Menzies Creek
Lysterfield Belgrave South Belgrave South Belgrave South Belgrave South Cardinia
Lysterfield Narre Warren East Narre Warren East Narre Warren East Narre Warren East Cardinia