1927 – Henry Ford publically apologises for his anti-Semitism

Henry Ford, famously the founder of the Ford Motor Company, was also something of an anti-Semite. The kind of something where he was the first person to publish the fraudulent and racist “Protocols of the Elders of Zion” in America, serialising it in The Dearborn Independent, a newspaper he owned. They also serialised “The International Jew”, an anti-semitic work penned by Ford himself. The Independent was infamous for its anti-semitism, and in 1927, it was shut down for good after a civil lawsuit for libel.

A boycott organised by the Anti-Defamation League proved so damaging to Ford’s business interests that he actually apologised for the racism so frequently displayed in The Dearborn Independent, writing an open letter to Sigmund Livingston, the president of the ADL. Most people accepted the apology and let the matter rest there, although it has been claimed that the apology was faked by Ford’s employees, with even the signature a forgery. Privately, Ford spoke of his intention to republish some day, and at Nuremberg, some of the Nazis spoke of being inspired to their hideous genocide by reading “The International Jew”.

Referenced in:
Since Henry Ford Apologized to Me — The Happiness Boys

1927 – Charles Lindbergh completes the first solo non-stop trans-Atlantic flight

In the 1920’s, aviators were heroes. They were bold explorers and experimenters, pushing back the boundaries of the known. And none of them loomed larger in the public eye than Charles “Lucky” Lindbergh.

At the age of 25, this formerly obscure US Air Mail pilot was catapulted to fame and fortune when he completed the remarkable feat of being the first man to fly solo across the Atlantic. Flying a custom-built single engine monoplane named The Spirit of St Louis, he took off from from Roosevelt Field on Long Island shortly before 8AM on May 20, and landed 35 hours later at Le Bourget Field in Paris.

This exploit won him the Orteig Prize, a sum of $25,000. He was also feted and decorated, receiving the Medal of Honor from the USA and the Legion of Honour from France, among other awards.

Referenced in:
Lucky Lindy – Tony Randall
All That Jazz – ‘Chicago’ cast
Lindbergh (The Eagle Of The U.S.A.) – written by Howard Johnson and Al Sherman