Is Aiwass really Galactus?

So I was reading some old Silver Surfer comics the other day, and I found something… odd. Really odd.

It’s this panel:
"Every man and Every Woman is a Star"

In which Galactus, the Eater of Worlds and generally one of the most powerful beings in the Marvel Universe, speaks a line of philosophical gibberish. Except that it’s not just any line of philosophical gibberish. No indeed. It is, in fact, a direct quote of Aleister Crowley’s Liber vel Legis (or The Book of the Law, in English). Specifically, chapter one, verse three. (See for yourself.) And it seems rather unlikely that Steve Englehart, who is a very deliberate sort of a writer, used the line by chance. He at least was no doubt aware of its significance and origins (unlike his editor and a large number of his readers).

Funny thing about Liber vel Legis: Crowley always claimed that it was dictated to him by a spirit across April 8, 9 and 10, 1904. A spirit that Crowley referred to be the name Aiwass, and claimed was his own personal Holy Guardian Angel (caps in original).

Now, many later occultists have theorised that Aiwass was simply a part of Crowley’s subconscious (and I lean toward that interpretation myself). Maybe that is the case – in our world! The Marvel Universe, on the other hand, is considerably weirder than our world, though, and since it seems rather unlikely that Galactus would be reading the works of human occultists, I have to assume that the causal relationship runs in the opposite direction, and that it was Galactus who dictated Liber vel Legis to Crowley. Which might explain why Galactus is always finding reasons not to eat our particular world.

So there you go.

Except that there’s more.

You see, Aleister Crowley claimed that Lewis Carroll – the pen name of Charles Dodgson, author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Jabberwocky and Through The Looking Glass – was a holy seer of sorts. Robert Anton Wilson took this one step further, claiming that the Alice books were dictated to Dodgson by a spirit he called Lewis (in case you’re wondering: Carroll because the spirit allegedly sang, or caroled, the books to Dodgson), and that Lewis and Aiwass are one and the same.

So there’s a case to be made that in the Marvel Universe, this guy:
Galactus
is the true author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Jabberwocky, Through The Looking Glass and Liber vel Legis

Donald Trump: Performance Artist

Dear Fellow humans:

Over the last few months, I have been watching the rise of Donald Trump in the Republican Primaries with some alarm. I mean, seriously, most of the Republican front-runners are disturbing in one way or another (Carly Fiorina’s insistence that what can most charitably be termed her hallucinations while watching a video are more valid than what the people who actually made the video say is in there; Ben Carson’s attempt to brand himself as in some way dangerous; Jeb Bush’s increasingly obvious desire to be somewhere, anywhere, else; Rand Paul’s existence; etc.) but the Donald is head and shoulders above the pack. He’s not just the clear front-runner in the polls, but also the clear front-runner in sheer offensiveness. He’s the kind of politician who makes satirists take to (more) drink, because there’s no way to exaggerate the reality of what Trump says. As Hunter Thompson said in similar circumstances, “the reality itself is too intense.”

Trump at CPAC 2011. Photo by Gage Skidmore.

Trump at CPAC 2011.
Photo by Gage Skidmore.

It’s at times like this I miss Stewart and Colbert. And understand, I mean no insult to Trevor Noah or Larry Wilmore – it’s nothing more than the difference a decade plus of hosting makes. In 2026, those two will be honed by experience to an edge of satire even sharper than we now remember Jon and Stephen being. In 2016, even they are stumbling to keep up with Trump. How does he do it? How does he confound some of the best satirists in the world? How is he always one step ahead?

And then it came to me.

How Trump does it.

The candidacy of Donald Trump is nothing more than the next logical step from the persona Stephen Colbert played for all those years on The Colbert Report.

He can’t be satirised precisely because his entire candidacy is nothing more than a giant satire of the entire system it purports to be a part of. Donald Trump the Candidate is merely a character played by Donald Trump the man.

And Donald Trump the man is very, very good at his art.

Now, I realise that there is no evidence at all to suggest that my theory is correct, but of course, there wouldn’t be. Trump isn’t about to leave that to chance, after all. Of course he’s going to be all “pay no attention to the man behind the curtain” at this point in the proceedings. A year from now, maybe, he’ll come clean (although frankly, I think a posthumously released home video memoir is the most likely way he’ll tell the truth: free of consequence and at a profit).

Nor should anyone think that I mean to insult Trump with this theory. Quite the reverse – if I am correct, Trump is an absolute genius of political satire. Indeed, listening to the hateful, moronic bile that spews from the word-hole beneath that horrid toupee, I think that this theory is the only viable one for anyone who wants to respect Trump’s intelligence and media savvy.

Trump's star at the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Photo by Adam Fagen.

Trump’s star at the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
Photo by Adam Fagen.

Starting at the Top

There’s a phenomenon that happens across all media that I always find bothersome, as much as I also see it as more or less a historical inevitability. It’s that people try to introduce other people to media – in this case, I mostly mean ‘to a particular genre’ by giving them the wrong starting places.
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One Long Fight Scene

I’ve heard the criticism “that’s just one long fight scene” made more and more often lately. Hell, I’ve even made it myself – in fairness, it’s hard to interpret the opening arc of the new Justice League title any other way. And certainly Marvel’s next big Event comic, Avengers vs X-Men basically proclaims itself to be that in the very title.

But why is the fight scene so prevalent?
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Goin’ to Gotham

Is it just me, or has Gotham City suddenly become the tourist Mecca of the New DC Universe? This confuses me somewhat. For a city that’s routinely described as a wretched hive of scum and villainy, of crumbling ethics and infrastructure, with no visible tourist attractions beyond the Bat-Signal, it’s ludicrously popular as a place to visit.

I mean, this is a city whose native wildlife is probably the only such fauna to be more dangerous than that of the Australian Outback. It’s a place where bright colours are a sign of imminent danger, and dark colours a sign that danger will soon be imminent. It’s a city where they call the wind “the Razor”. Who in their right mind would ever want to go there?
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Team Players

There are some characters in comics who are by nature joiners. You can barely get two people together for a team up before they arrive as well.

And then there are those others who are regarded as dangerous loose cannons of dubious loyalties.

This is an article about two such characters, and how each of them is the undisputed greatest team player of their particular universe.
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The Inevitable Super-Villain Army

It’s a time-honoured trope of superhero comics: sooner or later, one or another of the various A-list supervillains will decide to gather all the other (and hence, lesser) villain under their command, and be-devil the heroes with them. There’s a number of reasons why this idea is flawed to the point of suckage, and why it should be given a nice long rest:
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Bendis and the Crazy People

More than most writers working in comics these days, Mr Brian Michael Bendis loves him some batshit crazy villains. Don’t get me wrong, I totally see the attraction of that, and hey, some characters just are that way to begin with. I mean, if you’re writing Loki, you know that his basic deal is that he messes with people pretty much because messing with people is what he does. (Well, if you’re writing Loki and your name’s not Kieron Gillen, anyways.) But it’s more than that with Bendis.
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Timeline Watch: the New DC

Welcome to the first installment of an occasional series on comics and continuity. Today’s column concerns itself with the newly-rebooted DC Universe – which started again not quite from scratch back in September. Now, two months in, it’s time for a little analysis.
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Something that annoys me, and my promise to you

As you probably know if you’ve spent much time wandering around on this site, I have devoted a fairly considerable amount of time to working out what order events in various fictional universes – primarily comics universes – take place in. This takes a not inconsiderable amount of research, since it means reading most – if not all – of the comics listed.
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The Coolest Batman Villain

There’s only been a few hundred Batman villains over the years, due to most of them having a tendency to come back again and again and again…

…and let’s face it, I’m going to be talking about one of the big guns here.  One of the longest-lasting and most well-known of all Batfoes.  So you can rule out Film Freak and Ratcatcher and all those villain-come-latelies.

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Where the Skrulls went wrong

I read – and, I confess, immensely enjoyed – Secret Invasion a few months back. So if you haven’t read it, or you’re just not a serious comics geek like I am, I advise you not to read the rest of this post.

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