Hair-Raising Potion

Few details are known about Hair-Raising Potion. As the name suggests, the potion causes the imbiber’s hair to stand on end. That’s about it.

Oh, and one of the ingredients is an unspecified number of rat tails. No one knows why, and we’re all happier that way.

Much happier.

Hyperdrene

Of unknown derivation, Hyperdrene is generally considered to be an hallucinogen, as the imps and pixies one sees under its influence are presumably hallucinations.

However, these hallucinations can be seen by other people too, although only during the 4-5 hours that the drug’s effects last, which begs the question of whether or not they are real.

It is possible that Hyperdrene is not an hallucinogen at all, but rather a drug that creates a briefly existing super-position between this dimension and the adjacent one more usually inhabited by the pixies. Attempts to question the pixies about this have been fruitless, as their only form of communication appears to be reciting nonsensical couplets.

Related drugs: Darkshots, Mongoose Blood and Xenite

Love Potion No. 9

Love Potion No. 9 is an aphrodisiac of undeniable potency, and great caution is urged in its use. It is a deep black in colour and smells not unlike turpentine.

As far as can be told, it is sold only by Madame Rue, a gypsy reader of palms and maker of potions who, as of 1959, lived at a place on the corner of Vine St and 34th St (now Jefferson Boulevard) in Los Angeles.

It induces feelings of extreme amorousness in those who imbibe it, although how long these last and the appropriate dosage are details lost in the mists of time. Lost with them, apparently, are Love Potions No. 1 through 8, whose existence can be assumed from this Potion’s number.

Mei Kuan

Mei Kuan is an extremely potent mind-expanding drug – a few drops of it could cause permanent insanity or death to all but the strongest-willed users.

It is of Oriental origin, and appears to be a preparation of a variety of drugs and herbs, very likely including opium. Under its effects, users experience heightened perceptions and cognition, transporting themselves into realms of abstract concepts and higher spiritual planes.

Related Drugs: beng lie

Miruvóre

The exact translation of Miruvor or Miruvóre, is not known, but “death-defeater” is a probable etymological meaning. It’s certainly an accurate description.

Appearing in The Fellowship of the Rings, miruvor is a warm and fragrant clear cordial made by and consumed by the Elves. They do not reveal how miruvor was made, but it is thought to come from the honey of the undying flowers in the gardens of Yavanna in Valinor. It’s possible that this drink holds the secret of Elven immortality, although if so, it has no such effect on humans, hobbits or dwarves.

The cordial gives the drinker renewed strength and vitality, and is used by the Elves at their festivals. Some party animals, those Elves, huh?

Related drugs: Athelas, Ent-Draughts and Pipe-Weed.

Nightmare

Deadly and dangerous, Nightmare is a drug that, as the name suggests, causes nightmares in the user. Perhaps more disturbingly, it implants pre-recorded nightmares in them.

Found only in Al Amarja, Nightmare is made from the excretions of tulpas – dream entities that have managed to acheive a physical existence in the mundane world. Pushers of the drug, known as Sandmen, gather this dung, and record the nightmares of potent dreamers by smearing it on their foreheads while they sleep.

The dung is then collected, and processed into an injectable serum, and sold to the rich and jaded whose capacity to experience strong emotions has atrophied.

Related Drugs: Blue Shock, Communion, MDA-Cubed, Relapse, Slo-Mo, Wings and Zorro.

Orpheus

Orpheus is a vampire drug, a mystical opiate which is taken in with the blood of those they feed from – the humans typically inject the drug into their bloodstreams before the feeding.

The enchanted drug can be easily tasted on the blood, and its effects on the vampire are very quick, especially if the dose is large. Of course, a dose that large will tend to knock out the human, leaving them in a comatose – and potentially fatal – state.

Smaller doses can be euphoric for both parties, but larger ones induce what can only be described as a vision quest, in which both parties travel through the history of the vampire in question, and choices made along the way determine whether either of them ever wakes up again. This experience of taking the drug has been described as being taken to Hell and left there.

Related Drugs: Black Frost, Calendula, Calynthia Powder and Gill Man DNA.

Polyjuice Potion

Polyjuice Potion is an alchemical preparation that allows a human drinker to temporarily assume the form of another person – although only a particular person. In particular, it cannot be used to take the form of any non-human – although numerous attempts have ended in the potion drinker being stuck in some sort of in-between form.

The potion is a difficult and time-consuming one to prepare – among other things, it needs to brew for a month after its final brewing – and one of the most difficult to acquire ingredients is a sample of the target person, usually hair, although other substances will work just as well. Polyjuice Potion is also highly variable in the duration of its effect, with the quality of the numerous ingredients and the skill of the brewing both influencing the outcomes.

Poudre de la Mort Vraie

Both a drug and a poison, Poudre de la Mort VraieThe Powder of True Death or Powder of the True Death, depending on your translator – is specifically designed for use by vampires. Created by Signalman Reynolds, formely of His Majesty’s British Army, it is extremely potent and addictive to vampires.

Reynolds, whose own wife had been a vampire, spent decades discovering how to create a substance that vampires would be attracted to. The actual formula for the creation of the grey powder is unknown, although it includes the dust of ground up mummies and assorted alchemical treatments.

Its effect on vampires is exactly what Reynolds intended: it has a euphoric rush, but leaves the vampire overwhlemed with the guilt of all their actions (both as a human and as a vampire) and not at all hungry for blood. The idea is that the vampire will be tortured by both remorse and starvation as they slowly wither away to nothing – the taste of blood will lead a vampire who has consumed Poudre de la Mort Vraie retch and vomit.

A large enough dose of the untainted blood of another vampire will throw off the effects of the drug, and a small enough dose can be outlasted – after a few days, normal vampiric instincts will reassert themselves.

Prisoner’s Honey

Made solely by the bees who gather pollen from the subterranean black roses of Fallen London, Prisoner’s Honey is an unusual drug which transports those who use it physically into the realm of dreams.

Canny readers will have noticed that nowhere is how the users return to this reality specified.

Sentry Serum

An unlikely chemical of tapping into that same power that caused the Ten Plagues of Egypt – i.e. the Wrath of God – Sentry Serum was created by a un-named Professor in an attempt to recreate the Super Soldier Serum.

Clearly, he succeeded beyond his wildest dreams. Just as clearly, the addict and theif who took the sole, untested sample of the serum, Robert Reynolds, was manifestly unsuited for the nigh-infinite power it unleashed in him.

It is unclear whether the serum caused his multiple personalities, or merely exacerbated an existing tendency in Reynolds, but in either identity – the ‘heroic’ Sentry or the evil ‘Void’ – he had more power than he could easily control. With his death, it is unlikely that the serum will ever be recreated.

Soy Sauce

No, not that kind. Soy Sauce is a mysterious substance of curious and supernatural potency. Even a small dose will permently grant clairvoyant and other enhanced sensory abilities to the user. Of course, given the hallucinogenic and intoxicating effects of the drug, it can take the user a while to realise that these things are actually happening. And that’s just the start.

Possibly being a demonic entity in the form of a drug, or arising from an alternate timeline where bio-technology is considerably more developed. Certainly, among the abilities it seems to grant are time travel and dimensional travel. But its origin remains a mystery…

…for now.

TimeSerum

TimeSerum is derived from the venom of a now-extinct sub-species of the Gaboon Viper. Its name is something of a misnomer, as it enables one to travel through time only by that laziest of methods, suspended animation.

All known supplies of TimeSerum are under the control of members of the Rosicrucian conspiracy, stored in a vast container concealed beneath Stonehenge which is filled to a capacity equal to 200 Olympic-sized swimming pools (one of which has diving board, or so it is rumoured).

So far as is known, only two people – Alexander Pruitt and Robert Moray – have ever been dosed with it, both of them in the year 1658.