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The Rock’n’Roll History of the World: September 30

The Rock’n’Roll History of the World: September 29

Cake

Cake is a made up drug which is a metabolically bisturbile cranabolic amphetamoid, originating from the Czech Republic. After becoming popular in Prague at so-called “boom raves”, it spread to other European cities, notably London. It is so new that it was technically legal when it first reached the United Kingdom in 1997, in what became known as the ‘summer of death’.

Side effects of Cake include severe water retention, especially in the neck (a symptom referred to as ‘Czech Neck’, which is caused by the yellow dye frequently used to increase the visual appeal of the drug). Another common symptom is massive dehydration, caused by the body expelling the water via tears or vomit. Another effect of Cake, via its active chemical, dimesmeric anson-phosphate, a psychoactive that affects the part of the brain known as Shatner’s Bassoon, which deals with time perception, elongating it massively. Frequent users often experience symptoms of depression.

Cake is also known as “loonytoad quack”, “Joss Ackland’s spunky backpack”, “ponce on the heath”, “rustledust”, or “Hattie Jacques pretentious cheese wog”, and was once the subject of a question in Parliament by MP David Amess (Conservative Party Member for Basildon).

The scourge of Cake has apparently now been defeated, as it has not been sighted on the streets of Europe for well over a decade.

Update: Week Ending September 22, 2014

I keep trying, but it’s hard to stay focused at the moment. Maybe next week.

Continue reading Update: Week Ending September 22, 2014

Trinity War

Trinity War

This was hyped as the first big crossover event of the New 52, the culmination of two years of foreshadowing…
…which turned out to the be not quite true: it’s not the culmination of anything – it’s actually the prologue to Forever Evil.

Also, every single issue of this storyline is collected in the Trinity War hardcover. The purpose of this reading order is to help show which issues appear in which volumes of the regular series titles. It can be found here on the timeline.

Prologue
Free Comic Book Day 2012 #1 Trinity of Sin – Pandora, vol.1: The Curse
Justice League: Trinity War
Trinity of Sin: Pandora #1 Trinity of Sin – Pandora, vol.1: The Curse
Justice League: Trinity War
The Trinity War
Justice League #22 Justice League, vol.4: The Grid
Justice League: Trinity War
Justice League of America #6 Justice League of America, vol.1: World’s Most Dangerous
Justice League: Trinity War
Justice League Dark #22 Justice League Dark, vol.4: The Rebirth of Evil
Justice League: Trinity War
Constantine #5 [1] Constantine, vol.1: The Spark and the Flame
Justice League: Trinity War
Justice League #23 Justice League, vol.4: The Grid
Justice League: Trinity War
Trinity of Sin: Pandora #2 [2] Trinity of Sin – Pandora, vol.1: The Curse
Justice League: Trinity War
Trinity of Sin: The Phantom Stranger #11 Trinity of Sin – The Phantom Stranger, vol.2: Breach of Faith
Justice League: Trinity War
Justice League of America #7 Justice League of America, vol.1: World’s Most Dangerous
Justice League: Trinity War
Trinity of Sin: Pandora #3 [3] Trinity of Sin – Pandora, vol.1: The Curse
Justice League: Trinity War
Justice League Dark #23 Justice League Dark, vol.4: The Rebirth of Evil
Justice League: Trinity War

Notes:

  1. A largely pointless side-story involving Constantine and Shazam. Can safely be skipped.
  2. A side story tracking Pandora and foreshadowing Forever Evil, but not strictly necessary.
  3. A side story that confusingly refers to itself as occurring both after and before Justice League Dark #23.

Uscular

Uscular
-adjective

  1. of or pertaining to cellular matter.
  2. of normal or larger size.

1822 – Alexander Pearce and five others escape Macquarie Harbour

Alexander Pearce was a convict in the Macquarie Harbour “secondary punishment” penal colony when he and seven others made their escape. Being sent to “secondary punishment” means that these men, who had already been convicted in Britain and transported to Van Diemens Land, and had then misbehaved sufficiently to be singled out for additional punishment in harsher conditions.

The other convicts: Alexander Dalton, Thomas Bodenham, William Kennerly, Matthew Travers, Edward Brown, Robert Greenhill and John Mather. Brown and Kennerly soon gave up and turned back. They were recaptured by the Macquarie Harbour authorities and died in the prison infirmary. The authorities more or less gave up the search at this point, reasoning that the elements or the natives would kill them. They were wrong about this, but just how wrong they wouldn’t know for more than another year.

Referenced in:
A Tale They Won’t Believe — Weddings, Parties, Anything

Roundt

Roundt
-noun

  1. A meeting or conference.

Akira

A highly addictive drug, Akira is an enhancer of psychic powers. It turns ordinary mortals into psychics, and those who already have magical or psychic talents into virtual superhumans – while it lasts.

The exact details of its naming are unknown, but it seems likely that it was named for the legendary Japanese comic series, which prominently features psychic powers.

Akira enjoyed a brief vogue as the drug of choice of Los Angeles’ Sub Rosa (i.e. magical) subculture, but the strongly expressed disapproval of Sandman Slim (and the disappearance of its source) put paid to that.

Related drugs: Cupbearer’s Elixir.

Manent

Manent
-adjective

  1. not happening soon.

1992 — S.I. Hayakawa dies

A noted populariser of the ideas of Alfred Korzybski, especially general semantics, Samuel Ichiye Hayakawa was a Japanese-American academic. He wrote numerous books on semantics and language, some of which remain in use as textbooks even today (notably his “Language in Thought and Action” which is now in its fifth edition).

Hayakawa was the president of San Francisco State College from 1968 to 1973. As president, his most notable action was the creation of an Ethnic Studies department after pressure from Black Panther and student protestors. In 1977, he became a member of the United States Senate (California, R), a role which he held until 1983. He died in 1992 at the age of 85.

Referenced in:
Black Man — Stevie Wonder

Fortless

Fortless
-adjective

  1. comfortable.
  2. comforting.

1984 — Boom Boom Mancini defeats Bobby Chacon

Mancini’s 1984 bout against Chacon was his fourth title defence (he had won the World Boxing Association Lightweight title in May 1982), and he once again triumphed, although this match was decided when the referee stopped it in the third round after a cut above Chacon’s eye began to bleed.

For Mancini, it was a last hurrah in many ways. A few months later, he would lose his next title bout, and after he lost a rematch for the title the following year, he largely stopped boxing, although he remained in the public eye.

Referenced in:
Boom Boom Mancini — Warren Zevon